my first yahoo answer, and not poisoning myself on lithium ions

I just finished some impressive handiwork replacing my 3G ipod battery (so far, so good — it’s charging) and found myself with an old lithium ion battery which, the packaging said, i absolutely could not discard in the trash. (Side note regarding my skillz: If you compare my hackery with the likes of tom’s breadboarding and sottering, based solely on appearances, i think I measure up quite well.)Of course, Newer Technology made no effort whatsoever to tell me what i, or anyone with a conscience, was supposed to do with said battery that could not be tossed. After all, why should my kids be forced to swim with terrorists in lithium-coated waters just so that i can have the pleasure of listening to a couple more hours of emo?So I asked The Internet and the internet delivered, as usual. After a few false trails on google, i was bopped over to Yahoo! Answers, where i found, “Discarding a battery?” Perfect! Well, almost. Everyone confirmed that I shouldn’t jettison it, but the majority told me to go the local recycling depot, which is a ridiculously impractical idea, since I have no idea where such a depot would be found along my commute to work.I did, however, find through some pages linked from the answer page that you can take your battery to almost any electronics or phone store and they’ll take the weapon off your hands at no charge, which was exactly what I wanted to hear. So i logged in and added my very first Yahoo! Answer to the Yahoo! Question and hopefully someone will Yahoo! benefit soon from my goodwill. I was impressed at how easy it was and rewarding to post an answer.Then, logically, i was smartly asked to take the next action (since I was presumably on a roll after answering my very first Q) and answer another question. Top of the suggestions list: Teen party dillema. Thanks, Yahoo. I help you save the planet and now you want to turn me into a child predator. I’ll pass.

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One thought on “my first yahoo answer, and not poisoning myself on lithium ions

  1. You’re a good man, Michael Silberman. But you should also take heart about discarded LiON batteries: they’re not nearly as awful for the planet as NiCds, NiMH or lead acid batteries. They’re just more likely to light themselves on fire upon their innards coming in contact with air, is all.Anyway, good to know about electronics stores. I think fire departments frequently collect batteries, too.

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